10 Week Half Marathon Programme

This 10-week half-marathon training plan for novices gradually builds mileage, blending long runs with faster-paced workouts to boost endurance and develop speed.

 

KEY

REST/XT:  Ideally, do no exercise. Non-impact cross-training like stretching, yoga, or swimming is fine.

EZ Run: Run at a conversational pace or cross-train. When on a bike or rowing or elliptical machine, maintain a sustained aerobic effort.

LSD: Long, slow distance run that builds endurance. Run at a conversational pace. LSDs are rehearsals for race day – use them to determine your gear choices and fueling strategies before and during the run.

Tempo: These teach your body how to hold a faster pace over time. Do them at a comfortably hard pace, where you can talk in phrases. To find your tempo pace, see ‘How fast should I run?’ (facing page).

10-K Race: This ‘tune-up’ race is optional. If you choose to do it, use it as a race rehearsal for your half-marathon – practice what you’ll wear, eat, and drink, as well as your pacing strategy.

Got questions about the programme? Are you ready to run a half marathon? What happens when you miss a week of training? Don’t worry: we’ve got your answers, here.

Am I ready to run a half marathon?

Got something to say?

  • dean

    i live in an issolated area where i do not have any accsess to 10km races what can i do to subsitute

    • http://none blah blah

      10KM

    • jen

      I looked around, and this is the best 10 week plan out there. Thanks!

    • Sol Werth

      Am running the 21k half marathon in the Nairobi Standard Charted marathon 2013. Ive been doing 5k at 22mins. hope this helps

    • Kate

      Im just curious about the LSD’s on sunday. They seem to amp up in distance quickly from week to week without building up, e.g. week 8 we go from 10km on thursday to 19 km that sunday, adding on 9km.

  • Janine Roux

    Ok, so my friend Terry and I decided that the Knysna 1/2 marathon was on our bucket list, and we needed a training program to meet our goal.
    Both of us being over 50, we needed to try to ensure a program that would keep us injury free, and result in an enjoyable run.

    Well, although we both ended up with a week out of the program – due to the flu, or work pressures, the preparation ended up with a wonderful 21.1km, in a not too shabby time of 2:28 (which includes a rather long delay trying to get over a congested start line.)

    Thank you ! it certainly worked for us :-)

  • Cameron

    I’m quite new to running, and I’ve heard that hill repeats and interval training (or Fartleks, I believe) is good to have in a training programme – where would one fit this in in the programme mentioned above?

    I see some of the runs have a certain distance at tempo pace – would this be the interval training? And with hill repeats, can one just throw them in anywhere?

    Thanks, some advice would be appreciated.